Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Jacob Ward
Science and Technology Correspondent for Al Jazeera america and former editor-in-chief of Popular Science
ALJAZAM 01/28/2014
Ward: A new agreement with the Justice Department will allow internet companies to reveal how often they hand over customer data to the government for national security investigations. It puts an end to legal action filed by the companies. And as Jacob Ward reports, there are new concerns about how much personal information spy agencies can collect from popular smartphone apps.
Jacob Ward
Science and Technology Correspondent for Al Jazeera america and former editor-in-chief of Popular Science
ALJAZAM 01/28/2014
Ward: The documents that Edward Snowden turned over seemed to be revealing a whole new trove of information that the N.S.A. is making use of - namely the apps that you and I use every day. It seems that the kinds of information that those apps are really built to try to get out of you - your geographic location, the names of people in your photographs, the geotag and metadata that goes with those photographs, and really all the information that is generated when you email someone from within an app, thereby turning over your contact list to the app maker. All of that is suddenly available to the N.S.A. for scooping up.
Jacob Ward
Science and Technology Correspondent for Al Jazeera america and former editor-in-chief of Popular Science
ALJAZAM 01/28/2014
Ward: Now, there are a couple of apps that are specifically mentioned in these documents, a - the 2008 document mentions Google maps specifically because it is basically a great geo-locator. It can detect within a couple of feet of where you are standing and can as a result provide incredibly useful information to any sort of surveillance system. Now keep in mind that’s a 2008 version of Google maps. Since then the app has tremendously been improved. At this point, the map offers up the ability to identify where your home and your work are, which means that you'll be conveniently handing that kind of information over, and it also tracks your history over time such that you are not only understanding exactly where you are at that moment , but where you have been in the last month or so. So your past searches are stored, all kinds of useful information.
Jacob Ward
Science and Technology Correspondent for Al Jazeera america and former editor-in-chief of Popular Science
ALJAZAM 01/28/2014
Ward: Now keep in mind also that there has really been almost no sense yet of how impactly they’re using the data, just that they are collecting enormous amounts of it. And certainly in the private sector a lot of data comes in. But finding ways to make connections within that data, very very difficult to do, and so it's unclear at this point just how much data they’re actually able to make use of, even though we know they’re collecting incredible amounts of it. Drayton: Jake Ward in San Francisco. We should point out the popular game "Angry Birds" has been named in reports. Angry birds maker, Rovio, denies any knowledge of how spy agencies may have gained access to users personal information through it’s app.
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